RECOGNITION

8/24/2007
Dave M. Strawser, Homeowner

“We have actually enjoyed watching the work progress, and what’s a little noise - it remind us of our tax dollars at work. It is amazing to us how much Scarsella workers accomplish in such a small footprint ...”

1/10/2006
Washington DOT
Kevin Dayton, P.E.

“It is very gratifying when we are able to commend a firm for their Superior performance on a department’s project ...”

6/16/2000
WA Dept. of Labor & Industries
Rob Parker, Safety & Health Specialist

“ ... please pass on to your employees and sub-contractors ‘WELL DONE.’ ... This is a sign that you and your employees have a strong committment to safety and health.”


It is often said that entrepreneurship takes courage. Brothers Tony and Leo Scarsella left their small farming town, in the foothills of Italy's Apennine Mountains, in hopes of a better life. Tony was just 17 years old, his older brother was 19, and they did not speak English. It was 1934, the United States was suffering through the Great Depression, but times were worse at home. They would send money back to their mother and family in Italy.

 

Tony and LeoTony and Leo were able to find jobs in the construction industry in Seattle. The work was hard, but they were used to that and had been through tough times before. They became American citizens and Tony served in the U.S. Army during WWII. After his service, Tony returned to Seattle and the brothers purchased an Army surplus Caterpillar D6 bulldozer. This same dozer is still proudly displayed in the parking lot at the company’s main office, a very sentimental piece of iron.

 

The brothers went into business for themselves, recognizing the opportunity of the post-war housing boom. Scarsella Brothers got its start digging basements for residential construction and gradually moved on to sewer and underground work for the City of Seattle. Eventually the company started bidding small road projects for King County and other municipalities.

 

Leo passed away in 1971, his younger brother Tony pressed on. Tony had five sons: Frank, Don, Bob, Gino, and Rick. Tony wanted his sons to continue his legacy someday but, much more than that, he wanted to instill in them his work ethic, dedication, and integrity. His boys got their start on the ends of brooms and shovels, Tony’s sons would learn the value of a dollar. His boys went to college, Tony had minimal formal schooling and stressed education above all else. They spent countless hours on long road trips with their father “looking at work” and observed their father’s savvy practicality at used equipment auctions. Today’s Scarsella Brothers carry their father’s very competitive, albeit conservative, spirit.

 

Tony taught his sons to value their employees, as they say "good help is hard to find". Many of Scarsella's employees have been here a very long time and knew Tony. Employees still talk about Tony’s joking, attention to waste, and, most of all, his extremely high expectations - all delivered in his distinctive accent.

 

All five of Tony’s sons manage the business today, applying the same high standards and guiding principles of its founders: work hard, treat people fairly, and manage costs wisely. The brothers hold the company’s sound reputation in the highest regard, keeping a close eye on operations.

 

The company has grown substantially, a testament to the owners’ dedication and philosophies. Scarsella Bros. remains at heart a family business; some of the third generation, Tony’s grandchildren, are now working at the company. They are beginning to assume their responsibilities as future leaders, all the while adhering to the founding principles that allowed this company to successfully develop into one of the region’s strongest heavy civil contractors.